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How to Complete the General Information Section of the Work PageEdit

This is the official style guide to filling in the general information section on work pages throughout the Shostakovich Wiki. The goal is to standardize this section to allow automated searches on field names. The work pages should be listed in the following.

If the information for any field is unavailable, then leave it blank. Never use "n/a" or "none".

Work TitleEdit

Give the title of the work as it appears in the page title, but omitting key signatures and opus/catalogue numbers

Alternative TitleEdit

Titles for the work that found in the edition or in standard reference sources, if they differ from the Work Title.

  • Different titles in the same language should be separated by spaces and a semi-colon.
  • Titles in different languages should be placed on separate lines with <br>.

Opus/Catalogue NumberEdit

If they exist, give the most commonly-used number first, with others separated by spaces and a semi-colon.

  • Always include the prefix "Op." (with no spaces) when giving the opus number
  • Ensure that the punctuation and spacing of catalogue prefixes is consistent with other works by the same composer.
Examples:
Op.15a
Op.90
WoO 12

KeyEdit

Give the key signature for the whole work (if there is one), not individual sections or movements.

Examples:
C major
B-flat major
G-sharp minor

Number of Movements/SectionsEdit

State the number and type of sections within the work.

  • For works that are continuous without any breaks, "1" can be used without further description.
  • For works that were unfinished by their composer, or which have been partly lost, add " (unfinished)" after the section number
Examples:
4 movements
10 numbers
5 chapters
4 volumes in 8 parts
3 acts and 4 scenes (unfinished)

The titles of the individual sections may be listed underneath, starting each line with a colon ( : ), and numbering them as they appear in the score. Key signatures and numbers of bars/measures can be given if known

Examples:
4 movements:
I. Adagio—Allegro non troppo (B minor, 354 bars)
II. Allegro con grazia (D major, 179 bars)
III. Allegro molto vivace (G major, 547 bars)
IV. Adagio lamentoso (B minor, 171 bars)

If the structure of the sections is complicated, consider putting this at the bottom of the workpage (outside the general information section), or moving it to the discussion section of the workpage.

Year/Date of CompositionEdit

The exact dates when a work was started and completed are often difficult to establish, even when a composer's manuscript is dated precisely, since works may be subject to frequent revision at times of performance and publication. For this reason it is advisable to give just a year or range of years of composition, instead of the exact month and day.

  • Use the en dash, without spaces, to separate start and end dates. You can use {{subst:EN}} to create an en dash, or see Wikipedia how to produce this on your keyboard
  • Use "ca." without a space, to indicate an approximate date (from the Latin word circa)
  • Use "by" or "after" if start or end dates of compostion are unknown
  • The symbol "(?)" after a date means that the information preceding it is doubtful
  • The term "revised" means that an existing work was subsequently altered by its composer
Examples:
1925
1963–65 [= begun in 1863 and completed in 1965]
1963–65(?) [= probably begun in 1963 and completed in 1965]
ca.1963–65 [= begun no earlier than 1963, and completed no later than 1965]
by 1921 [= start date unknown, but completed no later than 1921]

First PerformanceEdit

If the date of the first performance of the work is known, it should be given here. The place, occasion and names of performers may also be given if known.

  • Dates should be given in the format YY-MM-DD, according to the western (Gregorian) calendar.
  • Names of cities should come after the date and be separated by the " in " (including spaces)
  • The concert venue or occasion, if included, should come after the city, separated by a comma
Examples:
1924-05-07
1924-05-07 in Vienna
1924-05-07 in Vienna, Kärntnertortheater
  • If exact dates are unknown then only the year, or the year and the month may be given
Examples:
1950
1963-05

Use <br> to start a new line for the names of performers, if included.

  • List any soloists first (in score order), followed by the name of the orchestra/ensemble, and lastly the conductor.
  • Identify the role played by the performer in parentheses after their names
  • Names should be separated by spaces and a semi-colon

Year of First PublicationEdit

If the date of the first publication of the work is known, it should be given here.

  • The place of publication, publisher, plate numbers, and numbers of pages may also be given if known, in the form "City: Publisher, Year. Plate number. Number of pages"
  • Use "ca." (not c.), without a space, to indicate an approximate date (from the Latin word circa)
  • Use "by" or "after" if start or end dates of publication are unknown
  • The symbol "(?)" after a date means that the information preceding it is doubtful
  • Use the en dash, without spaces, to separate start and end dates, or ranges of plate numbers. You can use {{subst:EN}} to create an en dash, or see Wikipedia how to produce this on your keyboard
  • If a work was published in different forms (such as full scores and vocal scores) give this information at the end of the line. Start a new line with <br> for each different form of the work
Examples:
1802
ca.1910–15
Mainz: B. Schott’s Söhne, 1923
Leipzig: Bosworth & Co., 1894
Braunschweig: Litolff, ca.1900. Plate 1542
Moscow: P. Jurgenson, 1878. Plates 3302–3323. 249 pages. (vocal score)
Moscow: P. Jurgenson, 1880. Plate 3901. 357 pages (full score)

LibrettistEdit

The authors of text (librettists) used in the work are very important, as they can affect the work's copyright status. A work can have more than one librettist.

  • Give the names of all the librettist(s) for the work, including any translators, and the authors of literary works who are named as the source of the libretto
  • Check each name against the list at Category:librettists for Shostakovich, and use the form of their name listed there, if it appears
  • Include the years of birth and death, where known, in parentheses after their names
  • The Lied, Art Song, and Choral Texts Page can be helpful in identifying librettists and their dates
  • Use the en dash, without spaces, to separate birth and death years. You can use {{subst:EN}} to create an en dash, or see Wikipedia how to produce this on your keyboard
  • If the text comes from an identified literary source, give the title of the source and its year of publication, if this is known
  • Use "traditional" or "unknown" if the author of the text is unidentified
Examples:
Johann Conrad Lichtenberg (1689–1751)
Friedrich Rückert (1788–1866)
Lorenzo Da Ponte, based on Pierre Beaumarchais: La folle journée, ou le Mariage de Figaro (1784)
Heinrich Heine (1797–1856), translated by Mikhail Larionovich Mikhaylov (1829–1865)
Norwegian traditional
Unknown
  • If individual parts of a work have different librettists, then repeat the list given under "Number of Movements/Sections", but replacing the titles with the names of the librettists
1. Nikolay Platonovich Ogarev (1813–1877)
2. Vasily Andreyevich Zhukovsky (1783–1852)
3. Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov (1814–1841)

LanguageEdit

This is only required for vocal works that have texts, or for literary works.

  • Give the name of the language is it is known in English (for instance, "German" not "Deutsch")
  • If a work includes the same text in more than one language, list them in the order in which they appear, separated by spaces and the "/" symbol.
  • If individual sections of a work use different languages, so that all of them are needed to perform or read the work in full, list them in the order in which they appear, separated by spaces and a semicolon, and identify the sections in parentheses.
  • Use the language(s) of the first edition, and not any later translations. The Lied, Art Song, and Choral Texts Page can be helpful in identifying the original language
Examples:
French
German / English [= both languages are used in parallel, with the German text shown above the English]
Swedish (Nos.1–3 and 5) ; Danish (Nos.4 and 6) [= in a cycle of six songs, Swedish is the language used in four of them, and Danish in the remainder]
Polish / German (Nos.1–3) ; Czech / German (Nos.4–6) [= in a cycle of six songs, Polish was used in the first three, and Czech in the last three, with German translations given in the first edition for all six songs]

DedicationEdit

The name of the person or institution to whom the work is dedicated (if there is a dedication). This can be given in the form it appears in the score, with clarification given in brackets if necessary. If the dedicatee is a musician with their own category on IMSLP, then include a link to that category, using the same spelling of the name.

Examples:
Dr Eugenio Egas
"To my wife" (Elisabeth Bortkiewicz)
"K.R." (Grand Duke Konstantin Konstantinovich of Russia)
The Philharmonic Society of London
John Smith and Henry Jones

If the individual parts of a work are dedicated to different persons, then repeat the list given under "Number of Movements/Sections", but replacing the titles with the names of the dedicatees.

Examples:
1. Mariya Kondratyeva
2. Anna Davydova
3. Anna Merkling

Average DurationEdit

This should be given in whole minutes, with the word "minutes" written out in full.

  • For short pieces. ranges should be used instead of fractions (e.g. "2–3 minutes" not "2.5 minutes" or " 2'30 ").
  • If the piece lasts less than a minute, then seconds can be used instead.
Examples:
5 minutes
1–2 minutes
100 minutes
20–30 seconds

Timings for individual movements (as specified in the previous section) can also be given, if they are known.

Examples:
40 minutes (15 + 10 + 15)
125 minutes (45 + 25 + 30 + 25)

InstrumentationEdit

It is important to give correct and precise information in this section.

  • Names of instruments and ranges should be given in English, normally in the sequence shown below:
Voices (solo) — voices [unspecified], sopranos, mezzo-sopranos, contraltos, altos, tenors, baritones, bass-baritones, basses, narrators;
Choruses — mixed choruses, female choruses, male choruses, childrens voices;
Woodwinds — piccolos, flutes, alto flutes, bass flutes, flutes d'amore, recorders, oboes, oboes d'amore, English horns, bass oboes, chalumeaux, clarinets, bass clarinets, basset clarinets, basset horns, saxophones, bassoons, contrabassoons;
Brass — horns, trumpets, cornets, saxhorns, trombones, euphoniums, tubas, bass tubas;
Folk instruments — accordions, bagpipes, cimbaloms, concertinas, dulcimers, erhu, flageolets, harmonicas, musettes, ocarinas, pan pipes, pipa, sheng, toy instruments, vuvuzelas, xiao flutes, zithers
Percussion — timpani, drums, cymbals, triangles, celestas, glockenspiels, tubular bells, bells, marimbas, vibraphones, xylophones
Strings (plucked) — arpeggiones, guitars, lutes, barytons, banjos, ukeleles, mandolas, mandolins, harps
Strings (bowed) — violins, vielles, violas, tenor violas, violas da gamba, violas d'amore, viols, violones, cellos, cellones, double basses
Automated instruments — mechanical instruments, mechanical organ, electronic instruments, ondes martenot, synthesizer, theremin
Keyboard — claviers, clavichords, harpsichords, lute-harpsichords, pianos, piano left hand, piano right hand, piano 3 hands, piano 4 hands, piano 5 hands, piano 6 hands, 2 pianos 8 hands, toy pianos, pedal pianos, organs, organ 4 hands, harmoniums
Basso continuo — continuo
  • Separate the names of instruments with a comma followed by a space, without using the word "and".
  • Use numbers to group two or more instruments (e.g. "3 trombones", but don't use "1" before a single instrument name)
  • If solo instruments are used with an orchestra or instrumental ensemble, then list the solo instruments first, with " + " (including spaces) before the rest of the performers
  • The first character on the line should be capitalised, unless it is a number, but otherwise give instruments in lower-case letters (except for "English horn")
  • The word "voices" may be used instead of listing several independent voice parts
  • The word "strings" may be used instead of listing several independent string parts
  • The word "orchestra" may be used if a listing of the individual parts is unavailable
  • Keys for transposing instruments may also be given in parentheses after ther names. For example: "clarinet (B-flat)"
  • Instrumental doubling may be indicated by a "/" symbol between the instrument names. For example: "3 flutes/piccolo" means that one of the flute players also substitues on the the piccolo during the performance
  • For choral works, the letters S, A, T and B (without spaces) may be used in parentheses to represent the soprano, alto, tenor and bass parts of a chorus. For example, "mixed chorus (SSATTB)" means that the chorus comprises 2 soprano and 2 tenor sections with single alto and bass sections.
  • Optional instruments, which can be omitted, should be listed in parentheses. For example: "timpani, (bass drum, cymbals), strings" means that the bass drum and cymbal parts are optional.
  • Alternative instruments, where one instrument may be completely replaced by another, should be indicated by the word "or". For example: "flute or violin, piano" means that the work can be performed either by flute and piano, or by violin and piano.
  • The names of characters in stage works may be given in parentheses after their voice parts, separated by commas.
Examples:
Piano
Violin, cello or viola
2 violins, viola, cello
2 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets (B-flat}, bass clarinet (B-flat)
Piano + 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, timpani, strings
Mezzo-soprano, baritone + mixed chorus (SATB), 3 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, harp, strings
Soprano (Tatyana), 2 mezzo-sopranos (Larina, Filippyevna), contralto (Olga), 2 tenors (Lensky, Triquet), baritone (Onegin), 3 basses (Gremin, Captain, Zaretsky) + mixed chorus (SATB), piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets (A, B-flat), 2 bassoons, 4 horns (F), 2 trumpets (F), 3 trombones, timpani, harp, violins I, violins II, violas, cellos, double Basses

Related WorksEdit

If the current work is based on another work, or if its music was used later in other works, then that can be mentioned here in the form of a list (starting each new line with "<br>"). The {{LinkWork}} template can be used to link to other work pages, if they exist.

Examples:
Adapted from the second movement of the fourth symphony
Based on themes from the opera The Nose

External LinksEdit

Links to other sites should be placed here, in the form of a list (starting each new line with "<br>")

Examples:
Wikipedia
The Lied, Art Song, and Choral Texts Page

Extra InformationEdit

Any relevant information that does not fit into the above headings can be placed here

Citations Edit

IMSLP